Saturday, February 8, 2020

He is My Hero - Essay about my Grandfather Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

He is My Hero - about my Grandfather - Essay Example He might never have caned me but his advice challenged me even at a very tender age. He would always be straightforward with me and warned me that he was not going to watch me turn into a wicked child. He was a very loving man, not only towards me but also towards my grandmother. My grandfather had a great heart, to be sincere, I have not known anyone with such a heart. His face always shone with a smile even when facing hard times. Most thought his life was ever smooth but we who were around him knew the many hardships he had faced. Even when he was sick and could barely raise his head, he always preached peace and love. He would call all of us, his grandchildren and tell us how important it was to be good to other even when they were not good to us. Being a great physician, he would always inspire me by the way he dedicated himself to ensuring that he gave his best to his patients. Sometime he would wake up in the middle of the night to go attend to patients even he was not in duty , particularly when he learnt that there were emergency case. I will never forget one incidence since it really touched me. It revealed to me something I had never known about my grandfather. I would often go to see him in the hospital when I was young since he worked a few metres from our house. While I was visiting him on one of the occasions there happened to be a patient who needed a liver transplant but had not found a donor even after making requisitions from several organizations that deal with organ transplant. However, it happened that my grandfather’s liver matched with his. Nonetheless, the hospital prohibited organ donation by the staff members. Irrespective of this, my father requested the surgeon in charge to arrange for him to donate part of his liver to the almost dying man. The surgeon was reluctant and reported the matter to the hospital administrator. When the administrator learnt of my grandfather’s plan, he threatened to sack him if he decided to g o on with his plan. Most thought that my grandfather would give up and forget about the whole issue but his personality could not let him do so. He demanded that he had to donate his organ, which he eventually did though he lost his job. Most of his workmates felt that he was irrational since he was helping a stranger at the expense of his job. Even the family members could not understand his actions. Several years later, I asked him why he had chosen to do this. What he told me made me realize he was a rare kind of a person. He was a bighearted hero and no one or anything could prevent him from doing what he was right. He told me that the best thing you can do is to follow your instincts if you felt what you were doing was right, since you only have one chance to live. Giving up a job to enable him donate his liver was one of the greatest sacrifices that a person could ever make. We knew he was noble and generous but not to such an extent. Those who knew him in the hospital thought he was just a physician like any other doctor, but he was more than that. You only needed to know him more to realize the kind of a person he was. When he lost his job, he decided to dedicate himself to charity work. Some thought he was ridiculous to spend his time working as a volunteer in hospitals that took care of less privileged. According to him, he was just doing the right thing. He was such a talented doctor, but he used his talent

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Environmental Science Essay Example for Free

Environmental Science Essay Although attempting to subdivide existing farm plots and redistribute them may be considered suitable for the purposes of remediating food insecurity and rural poverty, there exists a significant amount of controversy over such a practice due to the issues such redistribution entail. For example, the redistribution of land would require that the distributing entity pick and choose claims and rights to land at their discretion, and such claims can range from historic, ancestral or even from â€Å"ownership of the till. † Land reform has met much resistance from even the most impoverished numbers of developing countries, and it would be difficult to attempt redistribution without shaking up the foundations of property rights. Farming co-ops provide a distinct advantage for farmers. First of all, they provide them the opportunity to act as a group, giving them a collective bargaining power that they do not possess as individuals and allows them to act in unison in seizing market opportunities while being able to manage risks together. In effect, they can leverage their interests better when united as a co-op and it is this asset that has brought success to the likes of the Ocean Spray Cranberry growers and the farmers of Sunkist. (Gable, 2006; Hieu, 2008) Opening up new land is perhaps the most rapidly actionable means of increasing the food supply for a growing population, but this also poses a liability with regards to environmental impact. The problem with agriculture, especially the large-scale grain-based industrial monoculture which has been developed to feed most of the world, is that it is largely unsustainable and has a detrimental effect on soil fertility. In the first half of the 20th century, a large portion of the American Midwest was reduced to desert due to aggressive expansion of the wheat growing agriculture. (Manning, 2004) As such, what is needed is not the expansion of the present industrial agriculture, but the development of techniques and technologies to improve farming so that yields are better, but without compromising sustainability. Pursuing job opportunities in the city is not entirely perfect, but it is a desirable direction towards the development of compact communities and urban density. When combined with practices such as permaculture, which is the development of perennial agricultural systems that resemble the systems found in natural ecology (Holmgren, 2003), compact communities effectively curtail many of the environmentally adverse effects of sprawl and the wastefulness of imposing distance between food production, residential zoning and urban sectors. (Sightline Institute, n. d. ) Ultimately, what is needed to address the needs of a growing population in the developing world is not the application of population control measures, or a voluntary call to asceticism, but the institution of developmental policies that recognize the needs and wants of human society on terms that are just to developing nations and corrective to developed ones. Alex Steffen (2006) notes that it is wrong to think we can talk developing nations out of pursuing their dreams, and deny them of the material luxury that citizens of developed nations take for granted. Therefore, what is necessary is bright green developmental policy, founded upon the idea that economic luxury continue without rendering the planet an uninhabitable wasteland. This would require cradle-to-cradle designs, closed-loop industrial systems and self-sustaining infrastructure, much of which is already possible today. The future is already here, it’s just not well distributed. REFERENCES Gable, C. (2006, October). â€Å"Fields of Power; Farming Co-Ops the Future of Biodiesel,† Organic Producer. Retrieved October 9, 2008 from: http://www. organicproducermag. com/index. cfm? fuseaction=feature. displayfeature_id=43 Hieu, T. (2008, July 27) â€Å"Farming co-ops may be answer to rural poverty. † Vietnam Business News. Retrieved October 9, 2008 from: http://www. vnbusinessnews. com/2008/07/farming-co-ops-may-be-answer-to-rural. html Manning, R. (2004) Against the Grain: How Agriculture Hijacked Civilization. New York, New York: North Point Press. Holmgren, D. (2003) Permaculture: Principles Pathways Beyond Sustainability. Hepburn Springs, Victoria, Australia: Holmgren Design Services. Sightline Institute. (n. d. ) â€Å"Build Complete, Compact Communities. † Sightline Institute. Retrieved October 8, 2008 from: http://www. sightline. org/research/sust_toolkit/fundamentals/great_places Steffen, A. (Ed. ) (2006) Worldchanging: A User’s Guide for the 21st Century. New York: Abrams, Inc.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Macbeth :: English Literature Essays

Macbeth The character of Macbeth is a classic example of a Shakespearean tragic hero. Some of the factors that justify this title to Macbeth are his greatness and outstanding potential, both as a warrior and a nobleman, his very powerful sense of ambition, and the outweighing of this flaw over his exceptional goodness. One of the many reasons that Macbeth is categorized as a tragic hero is his courage and success as a war hero. This is evident when, in the beginning of the play, the Captain narrates Macbeth’s braveries to Duncan, and the king himself refers to Macbeth as â€Å"noble Macbeth†. Right from the beginning of the play, Shakespeare clearly defines Macbeth as a well-respected war hero. The Captain talks about how Macbeth killed everybody in his path to get to Macdonwald and then â€Å"unseamed him from the nave to th’ chops† before finally spearing the head of his enemy. Furthermore, King Duncan himself refers to the protagonist as â€Å"noble Macbeth†, as he tells his noblemen, â€Å"What he (the Thane of Cawdor) hath lost, noble Macbeth had won† Therefore, the above mentioned instances convince the reader that Macbeth is indeed heroic, popular and courageous. Another reason leading to Macbeth’s tragic ending is his overpowering sense of ambition. This is discussed by his wife, Lady Macbeth, and Macbeth himself.After reading Macbeth’s letter, his wife voices concerns for him, one of which includes his ambition. She says that her husband has the ambition to be anything he wants, but not the heart to do what he has to do to get there. Moreover, Macbeth also characterizes himself as having a "vaulting ambition" which takes control of him and consumes his thoughts. Thus, Macbeth’s tragic flaw eventually leads to his self-destruction Yet another example of Macbeth’s tragic heroism is his flaw overtaking his capability to be naturally good. The murders of Duncan, Banquo and Macduff’s family are proof enough to show that Macbeth’s inner goodness and humanity have been destroyed and replaced by his ambition. When Duncan names Malcolm the Prince of Cumberland, Macbeth decides on the murder of the king. This involves him having to overcome hesitations, but aided by the persuasion of his wife, he undertakes this task. Additionally, Macbeth hires murderers to kill Banquo and his son, due to the witch’s prediction of Fleance becoming king. Finally, the slaughter of Macduff’s household by the same murderers, to ensure he would reach his ambition without obstacles, is a final seal to prove that Macbeth’s sense of ambition drives him to near-insanity. Macbeth :: English Literature Essays Macbeth The character of Macbeth is a classic example of a Shakespearean tragic hero. Some of the factors that justify this title to Macbeth are his greatness and outstanding potential, both as a warrior and a nobleman, his very powerful sense of ambition, and the outweighing of this flaw over his exceptional goodness. One of the many reasons that Macbeth is categorized as a tragic hero is his courage and success as a war hero. This is evident when, in the beginning of the play, the Captain narrates Macbeth’s braveries to Duncan, and the king himself refers to Macbeth as â€Å"noble Macbeth†. Right from the beginning of the play, Shakespeare clearly defines Macbeth as a well-respected war hero. The Captain talks about how Macbeth killed everybody in his path to get to Macdonwald and then â€Å"unseamed him from the nave to th’ chops† before finally spearing the head of his enemy. Furthermore, King Duncan himself refers to the protagonist as â€Å"noble Macbeth†, as he tells his noblemen, â€Å"What he (the Thane of Cawdor) hath lost, noble Macbeth had won† Therefore, the above mentioned instances convince the reader that Macbeth is indeed heroic, popular and courageous. Another reason leading to Macbeth’s tragic ending is his overpowering sense of ambition. This is discussed by his wife, Lady Macbeth, and Macbeth himself.After reading Macbeth’s letter, his wife voices concerns for him, one of which includes his ambition. She says that her husband has the ambition to be anything he wants, but not the heart to do what he has to do to get there. Moreover, Macbeth also characterizes himself as having a "vaulting ambition" which takes control of him and consumes his thoughts. Thus, Macbeth’s tragic flaw eventually leads to his self-destruction Yet another example of Macbeth’s tragic heroism is his flaw overtaking his capability to be naturally good. The murders of Duncan, Banquo and Macduff’s family are proof enough to show that Macbeth’s inner goodness and humanity have been destroyed and replaced by his ambition. When Duncan names Malcolm the Prince of Cumberland, Macbeth decides on the murder of the king. This involves him having to overcome hesitations, but aided by the persuasion of his wife, he undertakes this task. Additionally, Macbeth hires murderers to kill Banquo and his son, due to the witch’s prediction of Fleance becoming king. Finally, the slaughter of Macduff’s household by the same murderers, to ensure he would reach his ambition without obstacles, is a final seal to prove that Macbeth’s sense of ambition drives him to near-insanity.

Monday, January 13, 2020

High School Biology Lesson Plan – Properties of Water

Name:|Hailey Griffin| Lesson Plan Title:|Properties of Water| Grade Level: |10| Content Area:|Biology I| Sunshine State Standards or Common Core Standards:|Sunshine State Standards – SC. 912. L. 18. 12 – Discuss the special properties of water that contribute to Earth's suitability as an environment for life: cohesive behavior, ability to moderate temperature, expansion upon freezing, and versatility as a solvent. Behavior Objectives:|(Three parts: Condition, action, and measurement)Given a model of a water molecule, students will identify the oxygen and hydrogen atoms, the partial positive and negative areas of the molecule, and covalent bonds within the molecule. The learner will correctly identify the 4 main properties of water and give examples of each within 1 minute. Materials (including technology):|Students: Textbook, Pencil/Pen, PaperTeacher: Classroom board, markers, computer, Powerpoint presentation, Word processor, multiple copies of worksheets to pass out, Warm up :10 -15 Pennies, 10-15 Eye Droppers, Cups, Water Mini Labs: plastic petri dishes, paper clips, ethanol, water in eye droppers, glass slides, water, red food coloring, capillary tubes, straws, ice cubes, NaCl, salad oil in eye droppers, hot platesClosure: Koosh Ball| Hook/Anticipatory Set/Lead-In:Total Time: 15- 20 minutes|Prior to class, the instructor should gather the following supplies: Pennies, Eye droppers, Cups, Water.As students come into class, they should form groups of 3-4 people and pick up a one penny, one dropper, a small cup of water and return to their seats. They will also need a pencil/pen. Once every group has the proper materials, the instructor will hand out the accompanying worksheet (Appendix A). They should explain that each group is going to count how many drops of water will fit onto the top of a penny. The team with the most drops of water on their penny â€Å"wins†. As one student is dropping the water onto the penny, another should be count ing and recording the results.The other members of the group should be working on the worksheet, consulting their textbook for answers; this worksheet can be completed at home and is not to be turned in. | Procedures:Lecture: ~25 minutesWorksheet: Remaining class timeMini labs – Day 2, 45 minutes. |After the Penny Lab, the teacher should transition into a Powerpoint lecture on the properties of water (Powerpoint attached to lesson plan). The lecture should last for 25 minutes, enough time to get in the necessary information yet short enough to hold students’ attention.The following topics should be covered in the Powerpoint: the physical structure of a water molecule, states of matter, polarity, hydrophobic/hydrophilic substances, high heat capacity, cohesion/adhesion and surface tension, density and solubility. Once lecture is over, students will receive the Properties of Water worksheet (Appendix B) to work on during the rest of class and to complete as homework if n ot finished. This assignment will be due the following class period at the end of class and will be graded. The following class period, the teacher will set up the class into 6 â€Å"centers†.Each center is a mini lab and will focus on a certain property of water, the students should be able to use the knowledge they gained from the previous lesson to effectively answer questions about the properties of water. Each station will have a single worksheet (Appendix C) listing the procedure for the lab and 3-4 questions about the lab and property covered. Students must provide their own paper and copy down the questions and then respond; they can work together but must have their own answers. The work completed during lab time will be turned in a graded on the day of the test. minutes before class is over, the instructor should pass out a study guide and let students know that there will be a test the next class period, topics from both lecture and lab will be covered. | Guided an d Independent Practice: |On day 1, students will work together on the penny lab, and during lecture, students should be paying attention to the teacher. Finally, once the worksheet is handed out, students should be working independently. On day 2, students will be working in groups, rotating between centers; the teacher should be walking around class helping students when needed.On day 3 students will be working independently on the test. | Adaptations for ELL & ESE students|ELL students will have the opportunity to work with partners to receive peer support and help with complex concepts. Extra tutoring is available during lunch and afterschool. Vocabulary lists are available for pick up; students are encouraged to create flash cards to help them learn new vocabulary words. ELL students will also be given extended time to take tests. ESE students will be given extra time to complete assignments and complete tests.Complex directions will be clarified so the student is confident in w hat he/she is supposed to be doing. Students will be allowed to take short breaks during class and tests. | Closure Activity: |â€Å"Whip Around† Students quickly and verbally share one thing they learned in the class during the lesson. Students will pass around a koosh ball (or similar item) and whoever has the ball must give a short description of something they have learned. This could include topics from lecture, lab, or homework and could be an interesting fact, definition or short explanation of a concept.The teacher should be the first participant and will give an example of a good response, for example â€Å"Today I learned that solid water, or ice, forms a lattice structure which causes it to be less dense than liquid water, which makes it float. † This activity will end once everyone has shared their thoughts. If there is ample time and enough willing participants, this activity could also be used for students to gain extra credit points. Students who wanted to talk about additional concepts could earn up to 2 points extra credit towards their test.The previous day’s assignment should be collected. | Assessment/Evaluation:|On the start of the day 3, students will come into class and prepare for their exam. Once everyone is seated quietly the instructor should pass out the test in which students have approximately 40 minutes to complete (ESE and ELL students have more time). Once a student completes the test he/she should read quietly or work on other classwork. The lab assignment from day 2 should also be turned in for grading. | Appendix A Properties of Water: Penny LabTake a Guess: How many drops of water do you think will fit onto a penny? __________ Cohesion, adhesion, and surface tension are attractive forces between molecules and very important properties of water. Cohesion is the ability of water to â€Å"stick† to itself; it is a result of intramolecular forces (intra- inside, so this is adhesion within the molecul e). An example of cohesion is when you over fill a glass with water, the liquid rises above the rim of the glass but does not fall off the side; instead it bubbles up, which is also caused by surface tension.Surface tension is a special type of cohesion; it can be described as the â€Å"skin† on top of water, in the case of the overfilled glass, the surface tension caused the water to stick together and form the bubble over the rim, this property also allows some bugs to walk on water. Adhesion describes water sticking to other materials and is an intermolecular force (between neighboring molecules). Adhesion can be observed in the stem of a vascular plant; water molecules stick to the xylem tissue and â€Å"climb† up the plant. These properties occur because water is a polar molecule.A molecule of water is composed of 2 hydrogen atoms and 1 oxygen atom, because of the relationship shared between these atoms, one side become slightly more positive and the other slightl y more negative. These partial charges are symbolized by the Greek letter delta, or ?. The polarity of water molecules allows water to dissolve polar and charged substances, making water a good solvent. Molecules that are uncharged, such as fats and oils, usually do not dissolve in water and are called hydrophobic. Procedure: 1. Place a dry penny on a flat surface. 2.With the eye dropper, drip one drop of water onto the surface of the penny, one drop at a time. Have one student in your group keep track of the number of drops. 3. Observe the surface of the penny as the water builds up. 4. Once ANY amount of water has spilled over the edge of the penny record your final count of water drops. 5. Clean up your area and return materials to your teacher. Final Count: How many water droplets really fit onto the penny? ___________ Class Average ___________ Reflection: Explain your results in terms of cohesion and surface tension.What do you think would happen if we added soap, a hydrophobic substance, to the water before dropping it onto the penny? Explain your answer. Find a picture of a water molecule in your book, copy the drawing and label the following: oxygen molecule, hydrogen molecules, ? +, ? -, and draw the intramolecular bonds between the oxygen and hydrogen atoms. Appendix B Properties of Water 1. a. Draw the structure of water. Include the partial charges of each atom. b. Why is water considered to be a polar molecule? 2. a. What enables neighboring water molecules to hydrogen-bond to one another? b.How many hydrogen bonds can each water molecule form? 3. a. Explain the difference between adhesion and cohesion. Give an example of each. b. How do adhesion and cohesion explain capillary action? 4. What is surface tension? Give an example. 5. a. What is specific heat? b. Explain why water has such a high specific heat. c. Explain why it is cooler by the lake (or any body of water) in the summer and warmer by the lake in the winter. 6. a. Explain why ice is l ess dense as a solid than as a liquid. 7. a. Why is water called the universal solvent? What does polarity have to do with this? . How does water dissolve a substance like NaCl? Draw a picture illustrating this. 8. What do hydrophobic and hydrophilic mean? 9. List five special properties of water and give an example (other than ones from this worksheet) of each. Appendix C Center 1 – Can you float a paper clip? Procedure: Fill a plastic petri dish to overflowing with water. Without disturbing the surface of the water, start at the â€Å"lip† of the plastic bowl and slide the paper clip across onto the surface of the water. Observe the way the water â€Å"bends† under the paper clip. Record your observations.Repeat using ethanol in place of water. Questions: 1. What property (properties) of water is (are) demonstrated here? 2. How can the surface of water act this way? 3. Why did the paper clip not float on the ethanol? Center 2 – Can you overcome the attr action? Procedure: Using a dropper, place 2-3 drops of water on one glass slide. Lay the second glass slide over the first. Try to pull them apart. Record your observations. Repeat using dry slides. Questions: 1. What property (properties) of water is (are) at work here? 2. How are hydrogen bonds involved in this (these) property (properties)? . Explain why glass is described as hydrophilic. Center 3 – How does water move through plants? Procedure: Fill a capillary tube and then a straw with a red dye solution (red food coloring in water) and raise them to a vertical position. Record your observations. Questions: 1. What properties of water are at work here? How does water rise up the tube? 2. Why are these properties important to a plants survival? Center 4- Is a solid lighter than a liquid? Procedure: Put a cube of ice in a beaker labeled and filled with â€Å"alcohol† and another in a beaker labeled and filled with water.Observe where the ice cube is in relation to the surface of the solution. Quickly remove the ice cubes for the next group. Record your observations. Questions: 1. Why is the ice cube at the top or bottom of the alcohol? Water? 2. Why is frozen water less dense than liquid water? 3. Explain how this property of water is important to marine life. Center 5 – Like dissolves like Procedure: Place a spoonful of NaCl in a beaker of water and stir. Place 2 droppers full of salad oil in the beaker of water and stir. Record your observations. Questions: 1. Why does NaCl â€Å"dissolve† in the water? 2.Why is it essential for compounds like salt and glucose to be soluble in the water found in our body? 3. Does salad oil dissolve in water? Explain your answer. Center 6 – Does water boil sooner if salt is added? Procedure: Obtain 2 beakers, one labeled â€Å"deionized water† and the other â€Å"salt water†. Add 2 spoonfuls of salt to the beaker labeled â€Å"salt water† and stir to obtain a solutio n. Place each beaker, with a thermometer on it, on a hot plate and determine which beaker begins boiling first. Record your observations. Questions: 1. Does the addition of salt make the water boil faster or slower?Why? What does salt do to the boiling point of water? 2. Obtain an ice cube and add salt to it. What happened to the area of ice where the salt is applied? Why is salt applied to icy sidewalks or roads in the winter? What does salt do to the freezing point of water? Appendix D Properties of Water Test Name: ____________________ Period: ______ Properties of Water Test Review 1. Define the following vocabulary: Cohesion Adhesion Surface Tension Capillary action Hydrophobic Hydrophilic 2. How does water density change†¦. a. as the temperature of water increases ____________ b. s the salinity of water increases ____________ c. as the temperature of water decreases ____________ d. as the salinity of water decreases ____________ 3. What is a polar molecule? 4. What type of bonds exist between the atoms of a water molecule? 5. What type of bonds exist between the adjacent water molecules? 6. Why is water called the universal solvent? 8. What happens to the volume of water as it freezes? What happens to its density? True/False True False Water contracts (gets smaller) when it freezes. True False Water has a high surface tension. True False Condensation is water coming out of the air.True False It takes more energy to heat water at room temperature to 212o F than it does to change 212o F water to steam. Why is water called the universal solvent? What does polarity have to do with this? How many hydrogen bonds can each water molecule form? Differentiate between the intramolecular forces and the intermolecular forces at work inside and between water molecules. Please draw a water molecule. Label the following: oxygen molecule, hydrogen molecules, ? +, ? -, and draw the intramolecular bonds between the oxygen and hydrogen atoms.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

An Analysis Of Lorraine Hansberry s A Raisin Of The Sun

â€Å"A Raisin in the Sun† is an autobiographical play written in 1950 by Lorraine Hansberry, an African American writer. The main characters are the Younger family, Mama, his son Walter and her daughter Beneatha. The play dramatizes a conflict between the main characters’ dreams and their actual lives’ struggles in poverty and racism. The main characters’ lives as African-Americans contribute to their feeling of entrapment by poverty and racism. The play predicts the black society struggles in the years to come. Although their day to day lives in poverty put their individual dreams on hold, each one’s pursue to realize their dreams continues. For example, Walter, though constantly frustrated on not able to become rich quickly, he maintains his dream of finding a new way to support his family. For Mama, Walter’s mother, dreams are more important than material wealth, so she takes care and holds onto her plant. Her plant symbolizes her dream, her dream of taking care of her family by owning a house with a garden and a yard. Hence, she uses half of her husband’s death insurance money to make a deposit to buy a house. Dream that she shared with her husband before he dies. Walter depends on the rest of the insurance money from his father’s death to invest the money in a liquor store with his friends. Likewise, Walter’s sister, Beneatha, fights to hold on onto her dream of becoming a doctor and realizes she also depends on her father’s death insurance money to be able to attendShow MoreRelatedAnalysis Of Lorraine Hansberry s A Raisin And The Sun Essay2363 Words   |  10 PagesPoverty is always a great place to start a story, yet is there a lesson to be learned if the characters ends up right where they started? That is one of the several predicaments in the story â€Å"A Raisin in the Sun† by Afro American writer Lorraine Hansberry. The story takes place in Chicago during the late 1950â⠂¬â„¢s the civil rights era, and the most prevalent question is what makes an African American different to any other person. The story dives deep into what that is through the use of money, as theRead MoreAnalysis Of Lorraine Hansberry s A Raisin Of The Sun 1876 Words   |  8 PagesA Raisin in the Sun is a play written by Lorraine Hansberry in 1959. This is a story about an African American family striving to reach the American Dream despite significant financial difficulties and a racially oppressive environment in the postwar era. The passage I chose was from Act 2, scene 3 of the play. This is when the chairmen of the neighborhood committee in Clybourne Park, Mr. Lindner comes to speak with the Younger family about their future presence in the neighborhood. This passageRead MoreAnalysis Of Lorraine Hansberry s A Raisin Of The Sun 1343 Words   |  6 Pagesâ€Å"A Raisin in the Sun† is play written by Lorraine Hansberry about a struggling African American family. Set in the nineteen-fifties, the play explores the dynamics of how the family operates in a time era Chicago that challenges the family with poor economic status and racial prejudice. Hansberry uses dreams as one of her main themes in this play. Three of the characters, Walter, Beneatha, and Mama, all have a similar goal in their respective dreams, to improve the life of the whole family, butRead MoreAnalysis Of Lorraine Hansberry s A Raisin Of The Sun 1854 Words   |  8 Pageseven drink from the same water fountain. Schools being desegregated has helped young American people grow together in an educational environment, where they can build friendships with students of other races. Throughout the play, â€Å"A Raisin in the Sun†, Lorraine Hansberry vividly portrays the racism and discrimination of white people towards African-Americans in the fifties, as well as similarities to her own childhood. Walter Lee Younger, husband of Ruth Younger, works as a chauffeur for a rich whiteRead MoreAnalysis Of Lorraine Hansberry s A Raisin Of The Sun 1797 Words   |  8 Pages Worthless money itself All money brings is nothing but dreams and evil. Where there is money there is also dishonesty or corruption.. In a play called â€Å"A Raisin In The Sun† by Lorraine Hansberry, she focuses on the struggle that was faced by one African American family from late 1950s. As the play opens, the family are about to receive an insurance check for $10,000. This money comes from the death of Mr.Younger’s insurance policy. Everyone was very excited and were waiting for the money to beRead MoreCharacter Analysis Of Beneatha In A Raisin In The Sun1487 Words   |  6 PagesCharacter Analysis â€Å" A Raisin in the Sun† is a play written by Lorraine Hansberry about the life of an African American family during the era of segregation. The play starts off with the Younger family receiving a 10,000 dollar check from Mr. Younger’s insurance policy. The family argues over what they are going to do with it. Mama wants to buy a house with it, Walter wants to invest in a liquor store, and Beneatha wants to use the money to go to medical school. The contrast of the characters’ personalitiesRead MoreThe American Dream By Lorraine Hansberry1570 Words   |  7 Pagesabout it their whole lives? Many families struggle to even get close to the American Dream. In Lorraine Hansberry’s â€Å"A Raisin in the Sun†, the Younger family struggled for money, despite having numerous jobs, and a descendant living space. Being African American in the 1950’s made it difficult for the family to move up in class to achieve the American Dream. In â€Å"A Rai sin in the Sun† by Lorraine Hansberry, the Younger’s cannot fully achieve the American Dream due to societal obstacles they experienceRead MoreA Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry2035 Words   |  8 PagesLorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun is a remarkable play written in 1959 by an African American author about an African American family. This time period was in the early days of the modern awakening of civil rights awareness. It was a timely play challenging the then current stereotypical view of a black family by depicting a realistic portrayal of a specific black family with aspirations, hopes, dreams, dignity, and ambition as would be expected from all families regardless of race. TheRead MoreThe Matriarchs of the House in A Raisin in the Sun by Loraine Hansberry814 Words   |  3 PagesIn A Raisin in the Sun by Loraine Hansberry, the three strong-willed women of the story have varying opinions, views, and beliefs on life. The story is set in the Southside of Chicago, Illinois. The Younger’s are an African-American family that has struggled to survive financially for many years. With a large injection of money from Mr. Younger’s death, the family struggles to make a unanimous decision on what they will use the 10,000 dollars for. The three major female characters differ in a varietyRead MoreA Raisin In The Sun Archetypal Analysis1452 Words   |  6 Pagesarchetypal analysis that enables one to gain insight into the conventional and universal experiences within the society of which that form of literature is based upon. These repeating and shared experiences are especially prevalent in the literature of the 1950s, as it is a period of time characterized by social injustice and prejudice targeting not just individuals but entire groups such as blacks, women and other disenfranchised communities within American society. Accordingly, Lorraine Hansberry’s

Saturday, December 28, 2019

Grand Theory Critique - 1369 Words

Critique of a Grand Theory Wheeling Jesuit University Ida Jean Orlando is a well-known theorist in the realm of nursing. Orlando was born in 1926 and had a diverse nursing career which involved many titles and roles within the profession. Originally she received her diploma of nursing in 1947 at the New York Medical College. Over the years Orlando continued her education and in 1954 earned her Master’s degree in mental health consultation from Columbia University. Orlando worked as a staff nurse in many different areas of nursing and as a graduate of a Master’s program participated in research at Yale. It was 1961 when she published her first book titled â€Å"The Dynamic Nurse-Patient Relationship: Function, Process, and†¦show more content†¦Orlando used some direction of earlier theorists, Nightingale and Peplau, in developing her theory (George, 2010). The context and content of Orlando’s theory are congruent. Both show how individuality and a patient’s specific need call for individualit y to achieve affective outcomes. Orlando’s theory is consistent in every sense. Her concepts described and used in the theory, as well as its structure are consistent throughout. Through her research she carefully developed her theory and used it in nursing practice. The theory has a very distinct structure and ideals which are unwavering no matter what field of nursing you may practice in. The basis for the theory is very clear, and individuality of the patient is the base for nursing care no matter the situation. Orlando’s content of her theory is clearly stated and easily understood. With her research used to back up the theory and how effective it is to patient outcomes, it is clear to the nursing profession how useful it is. It is not complicated and the theory does not change under certain circumstances. It can clearly be used in any discipline of nursing and should be used by all practicing nurses in their care. The theory itself was developed strictly o ut of the use of research and grants assisting in the research done by Orlando. With the grants and Orlando’s education she was able to implement herShow MoreRelatedEssay about RoyCritique1322 Words   |  6 Pagesï » ¿ A Critique of Sister Callista Roy’s Adaptation Model Ashley Taylor Maryville University Roy’s Adaptation Model (RAM) is one of the most commonly used theories in nursing research and education for today’s modern nursing. It focuses on a person’s adaptation to his/her environment and guides nursing interventions in order to promote healthy adaptation. I chose the adaptation model because her model closely resembles my thoughts on nursing. The holistic approach and value on adaptation thatRead MoreMyra Levine Theory Critique Essay1224 Words   |  5 PagesRunning head: Theory Critique of Conservation Model Theory Critique of Levine’s Conservation Model Dana Carroll Nur 600 February 24, 2013 Jacqueline Saleeby Theory Critique of Levine’s Conservation Model Introduction Myra Levine proposed a grand theory of energy conservation. Using the Chinn and Kramer Model for critique, this paper will describe the theory reviewing purpose, concepts, definitions, relationships, structure, assumptions, and rationale for selection. Then, the theory will beRead MoreThe Effects Of Mass Communication On A Critical Branch Of Sociological Thought From 20th Century Social Thought1262 Words   |  6 Pagespractice of composite audiences and their agency, Mills, rightly, never was shook his distaste for behaviorism and its presuppositions. Shaped by this post-war infatuation with coding mass behaviour and his critique thereof, in The Sociological Imagination, Mills identified the emergence of Grand Theory (the term Mills used to mock Talcott Parsons’s work) and Abstracted Empiricism (a comment on Daniel Bell’s work.) Stemming from his close experience with large public opinion survey research, he was dissatisfiedRead MoreMorality via Kant and Hegel1712 Words   |  7 Pagesaccompanied by a questioning of the very nature of the moral: Is there an impartial criterion that enables us to know objectively what one ought to do, or do our moral intuitions rest solely on subjective, arbitrary grounds? With the lure of divine command theory fading from the Enlightenment and onwards, modern moral philosophy can be seen as an attempt to uncover either the criterion or its nonexistence. An endeavor in which few can be said to have been as influential as Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) and hisRead MoreInessential Woman855 Words   |  4 Pagesechoed many of the issues we addressed in Global Feminism last semester. As Spelman illustrates, those issues of difference, exclusion, essentialism, race, class, white middle-class heteronormativity, remain difficult and complex within feminist theories. I start by saying that I found myself confused at times and having to re-read quite often. I was taken by Spelmans introduction and the analogous yet paradoxical examples of Uncle Theo and the multiplicity of the pebbles to trouble the issuesRead MoreEthical Approaches Critique Paper1118 Words   |  5 Pagesthe Grand Principles, Nash’s Covenantal Business Ethic, Damon’s Four Dimensions of Business Morality, and Hill’s (2008) Christian Ethic for Business. Also, this paper critiques each of them through analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of approaches. Finally, the most favor approach is provided at the end. The Grand Principles which are called the prescriptive approach are provided by some philosophers such as Kant and Aristotle. The Grand Principles include Consequentialist Theories, DeontologicalRead MoreA Critique of Cloud and Townsend1359 Words   |  6 PagesA Critique of Cloud and Townsend A Critique of: Boundaries in Marriage by Dr. Henry Cloud and Dr. John Townsend       In their book, Boundaries in Marriage, the authors, Cloud and Townsend, present a theoretical model for maintaining healthy relationships, specifically marriage relationships. This examination of Cloud and Townsend’s approach to maintaining healthy relationships summarizes both the theoretical and theological orientation of their proposed model, compares their approach to theRead MorePostmodern American Artist s Cindy Sherman And Kara Walker Critique And Question Grand Narratives Of Gender, Race And1164 Words   |  5 PagesPostmodern American artist’s Cindy Sherman and Kara Walker critique and question grand narratives of gender, race and class through their work and art practice. Cindy Sherman, born 1954, is well renowned for her conceptual portraits of female characters and personas that question the representation of women, gender identity and the true (or untrue) nature of photography (Hattenstone 2011). Kara Walker, born 1969, is known for her black si lhouettes that dance across gallery walls and most recentlyRead MoreStructural Functionalism1448 Words   |  6 PagesStructural functionalism, or simply functionalism, is a framework for building theory that sees society as a complex system whose parts work together to promote solidarity and stability.[1] This approach looks at society through a macro-level orientation, which is a broad focus on the social structures that shape society as a whole, and believes that society has evolved like organisms.[2] This approach looks at both social structure and social functions. Functionalism addresses society as a wholeRead MoreEssay on Research Critique Part 1659 Words   |  3 Pages Research Critique Part 1 Grand Canyon University Introduction to Nursing Research NRS-433V Mary OConnell September 5, 2013 Research Critique Part 1 This paper will critique a qualitative research study published in the Journal of Medical Ethics in 2004, By Dr Helen Aveyard, about how nurses manage patients who refuse nursing care procedures. The article explains how nurses view informed consent as not being essential to nursing care procedures. Problem Statement The clinical problem

Thursday, December 19, 2019

Child Abuse and Cognitive Psychology - 1478 Words

Child Abuse and Cognitive Psychology Language is an important component in discussing cognitive psychology. There are many different aspects to language that can be broken down to better understand its functions. Language can be defined as â€Å"An organized way to combine words to communicate† (O’Brien, lecture notes 2014). In addition language is a communication system that is unique to humans. It is also something that is learned as opposed to being biologically inherited (O’Brien, lecture notes, 2014). Neuroimaging is also an important mechanism in cognitive psychology. Neuroimaging also known as brain imaging involves â€Å"the construction of pictures of the anatomy and functioning of intact brains through such techniques as computerized axial tomography, (CAT, or CT), positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)† (Galotti, 2014). Since language and neuroimaging are broad topics, this paper will examine how language and neuroimaging are affected in children who have been exposed to severe neglect and abuse. There are several studies that discuss how these two cognitive factors play a role in abused children. The first study was written by Audetter Sylvestre and Chantal Merette. In their paper they discuss language delays in severely neglected children. These Canadian researchers investigated severely neglected children that were 2-36 months in age (Sylvestre and Merette, 2010). They developed severalShow MoreRelatedTrauma- Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: an Effective Treatment Modality for Children and Adolescents Who Have Experienced Traumatic Incidents1687 Words   |  7 PagesTrauma- Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: An Effective treatment modality for children and Adolescents who have experienced traumatic incidents * What is TF-CBT and What is it Best Suited for: Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) was developed by psychologists J.A. Cohen and, Mannarino, Knudset and Sharon. TF-CBT has been developed for those who have experienced psychological trauma, often on a great scale of magnitude. It is important to define trauma; â€Å"There areRead MoreExamine Research on Applications of Life Span Psychology on the Children Defense Fund Program1254 Words   |  6 PagesExamine Research on Applications of Lifespan Psychology The purpose and focus of this week assignment is to select a program or an agency that conducts research on lifespan psychology to create applications that strengthen public policy and programs. The program selected for this assignment is the Children defense fund program. The Children Defense fund is a nationwide organization put in place to ensure that every child is treated fair and has an effective and promising start in life, regardlessRead MoreLifespan Development1516 Words   |  7 PagesLifespan Development and Personality Luis Cervantes PSY/103 January 11, 2016 Susanne Nishino Lifespan Development and Personality Developmental psychology is the study of how human beings age and transform throughout the eight major stages of life. This paper will focus on the physical, cognitive, social, moral, and personality development of individuals found in stage two, (early childhood 1-6 year olds). Through exploring, and examining the countless influences that affect their growthRead MoreThe Effect of Child Abuse on The Emotional Development of the Infant1229 Words   |  5 PagesThe Effect of Child Abuse on the Emotional Development of the Infant to Five Years Old in the United States A Review of the Literature Child abuse is one of the most serious issues in the United States today. Child abuse is the physical, emotional/ psychological or sexual maltreatment of a minor. Neglecting a child is another type of abuse, and includes malnutrition, abandonment, and/or inadequate care of a child’s safety. Additionally, any neglectful act can lead to physical or emotional harmRead MoreA Critical Reflection on Information Processing Theories of Trauma Response1613 Words   |  7 PagesExam number: CLPS11045 Word count: 1099 Introduction Cognitive theories that focus on information processing have been the most influential theories of trauma in terms of generating testable hypotheses and directing current treatments (Salmon Bryant, 2002). For this reason, we will attempt to critically evaluate this area of trauma theory with reference to other popular theories, the research evidence, clinical practice and developmental factors. Information Processing Theories of TraumaRead MorePsychology : Psychology And Psychology1519 Words   |  7 PagesPsychology has been defined by many as the study of mental disorder or behavioral problems but discoveries and developments, points to psychology as the study of human mind and its functionality which includes the way we think, act, perceive things and be able to make decisions; all these makes man a complex being. Psychology isn’t just a phenomenon; it is a scientific study. Psychology as a science answers the question â€Å"why†, proposes a theory and sets experiment to test the hypothesis. The researchRead MoreCurrent Event Psychology Article Review1433 Words   |  6 Pagesfactors at play that parents must keep in mind. They have to consider social and cultural issues, the ethics involved in the matter, as well as personal dynamics relating to psychology. The goal of the parents wasn’t a mere attempt to force traditional roles and values onto their children. However, they were respectful to their child own values. Parents and teachers would be more aware, constructive, and active participant in the formation of their child’s identity if researchers extended the focus ofRead More The Behaviorist and Cognitive Approaches to Psychology Essay1173 Words   |  5 PagesThe Behaviorist and Cognitive Approaches to Psychology In this essay I am going to explore two of the major approaches to Psychology, Cognitive theories and Behaviorist theories. I will discuss in some detail the two approaches, state how they compare and illustrate the similarities and the differences between them. John Watson, one of the founders of Behaviorism, based his theories on the principles of learning outlined by Pavlov who suggested the theory known asRead MoreThe Association Between Abuse And Children s Academic Level Essay1743 Words   |  7 PagesThe Association between Abuse by Parents and Children’s Academic Level Sydney D. Gore Research Plan 2016 Introduction Many children who experience abuse mentally, physically, or sexually tend to have troubles performing academically well in school. Maltreatment was predicted to negatively affect children s academic and behavioral alteration through the creation of discrepancies in academic engagement, social capabilities, ego resiliency, and ego control (Shonk, S. M., Cicchetti, D. 2001). MyRead MoreChild Maltreatment And Its Effects On Children Essay1327 Words   |  6 Pages Child Maltreatment Faith A. Hopper Columbia College HUMS 390 Child Maltreatment In the beginning of this course, maltreatment meant getting hit in areas of your body besides your buttocks. But as this class progressed through this class it gets much deeper than that. According to the New York Office of Child and Family Services, maltreatment is defined as the quality of care a child is receiving from those responsible for him/her. When a parent or individual who is legally responsible